Five Steps to Safely Open Revit Models

safely open revit models 1

As a contractor, we see Autodesk Revit models all the time from design partners, precast detailers, electrical contractors, engineers, and many others. If we get a Revit model (.RVT), we try to use it as much as possible. However, while the Revit format is easy to open, files provided by external sources often generate error messages, corrupt files and other unwelcome dialog boxes that can make working with these models a challenge. Fortunately, many headaches can be avoided by paying attention to how you open a file.  Continue reading…

Why You Should Be Modeling in Decimal Units

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Modeling for the field and/or layout demands more precision than your standard visualization model. If you’re based in the US, this is especially important. In Revit, for example, the units may be set to show up to 1/16 or 1/8 inches of precision. This means any dimension less than 1/8 of an inch will simply round up – a nice plus if you’re creating sheets but a shock to anyone using a model for layout.  Continue reading…

Six BIM Point Cloud Formats You Should Know About

bim point cloud formats

Scanning a space and bringing it into a program like Leica Cyclone will let you further manipulate the scans and, most importantly, stitch them together into a single cloud, which can then be exported as a standalone file. But what type of file do you need, and what do you do with it after it’s exported? There’s a growing list of point cloud formats being used in BIM. Here’s an overview of two primary groups of formats we’re seeing (and using) most often. Continue reading…

The Top Five BIM File Formats & How To Use Them

BIM Files-DWG files

Everyone has seen an email hit their inbox with attachments in file formats they’ve never heard of. While I can’t promise to explain the non-BIM formats, I would like to review a couple common formats we see pretty often in the BIM world. Here are the top five BIM file formats we see the most and what you can do with them. Continue reading…

Three Easy Ways to Check Spot Coordinates

spot checking in Autodesk AutoCAD

Whether you’re using the model for layout or just checking to ensure the slab you just drew is truly at 0′-0”, spot coordinates are useful for quick location information. Specifically, sometimes you need the Y, X, and Z (or Northing, Easting, Elevation) of a specific point, and standard linear dimensions won’t cut it. Here’s how to check spot coordinates in the three programs we use the most. Continue reading…