New Guide Helps MEP Contractors Navigate BIM

MCAA BIM guideThe Mechanical Contractors Association of America (MCAA) has launched a new guide to help MEP contractors understand how to incorporate and leverage leading edge technologies and processes into their projects’ spatial coordination efforts. Titled Achieving MEP Spatial Coordination Through BIM – A Guide for Specialty Contractors, the document was developed by a task force comprised of members from MCAA, the Sheet Metal and Air Conditioning Contractors National Association (SMACNA) and the National Electrical Contractors Association (NECA), with financial underwriting from the Mechanical Contracting Education & Research Foundation (MCERF). Continue reading…

Do You Have a BIM Execution Plan?

bim execution plan

Every successful BIM project starts with a plan. The BIM Execution Plan (BEP) is the standard document that defines the plan for the project, beginning with a kickoff meeting to get it all started. The goal in any BEP is to establish guidelines for creating, exchanging and maintaining digital project data. The document itself is meant to be continually updated as needed throughout the project as more players are brought on board. Continue reading…

Digital Layout Saves Concrete Contractor $2,000 Per Week

Walrite achieved a fast ROI with the Leica iCON robot 50

Concrete construction footing crews typically lay out footings with tape measures and strings. Once this process is completed, the layout begins. “It’s generally around this time when we’d find a mistake in excavation or some other problem,” says Craig Poortinga of Walrite LLC Colorado Foundation Contractors. “The guys would spend a good part of the day putting materials in the ground and the find out the footing wasn’t right so we wasted all that labor to get to that point. At $30 to $35 per hour pay plus insurance, etc., with a three- or four-person crew, it adds up quickly.” Continue reading…

Five Steps to Safely Open Revit Models

safely open revit models 1

As a contractor, we see Autodesk Revit models all the time from design partners, precast detailers, electrical contractors, engineers, and many others. If we get a Revit model (.RVT), we try to use it as much as possible. However, while the Revit format is easy to open, files provided by external sources often generate error messages, corrupt files and other unwelcome dialog boxes that can make working with these models a challenge. Fortunately, many headaches can be avoided by paying attention to how you open a file.  Continue reading…